On March 31, a prisoner escaped from a hospital about two miles from our house. He fired off a shot at police while he made his escape, and carjacked two individuals causing one car crash. The words, “armed and dangerous” and “area lock down” are not words that generally make the public feel safe, even after evidence suggested the prisoner had moved out of our immediate area.

It was this threat that made me realize how generally lax I am about safety in my own home. I had to confirm that the doors and windows were locked and as usual, I would have been lucky to find my phone to call 911 if I needed to. Theft and dangerous offenders aren’t something I worry about in our area because the crime rate is so low. It took an emergency for me to realize, “it might be a good idea if I knew how to lock our windows.”

Humans are terrible at judging risk. We’re categorically awful at it, and we don’t tend to act on slow-moving risks until the crisis is upon us. Reactively, rather than proactively. It looks like the same pattern is playing out in Washington State, where immunization

Image c/o The Seattle Times. Original can be found: https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/dfbde78e-d7fb-11e4-8dd6-4df606469ca8-300x730.jpg

Image c/o The Seattle Times. via: SeattleTimes.com

rates have surged 27% higher than this time last year in the wake of the Disney measles outbreak.

This is remarkable news as immunization rates in Washington State have lagged behind the national average and in the past Washingtonians haven’t always responded to the resurgence of a deadly early childhood disease with the same gusto. A 2011/2012 whooping cough epidemic caused no increase in immunization rates, despite sickening 2,520 residents.

So what’s changed this time?

There are a few potential hypotheses, which include:

  1. The perceived severity of the illnesses, with whooping cough being viewed, not necessarily accurately, as “less severe” than the measles;
  2. Media coverage of the outbreak has been extensive and may have had an educational and awareness impact on parents;
  3. Parents that vaccinate have become much more vocal since the Disneyland outbreak, which may have helped change social norms in certain areas;
  4. A bill was introduced to the Washington State House (and was defeated) that would have removed the personal belief exemptions many parents use to not vaccinate, and this may have prompted parents to vaccinate before its potential passage.

So the short answer is: we don’t know what changed this time. My guess is that it’s a combination of the factors above, and I can’t wait to read the studies once they’re published!

If you’d like to learn more about immunization rates in Washington State, you can read the article from the Seattle Times: Measles vaccinations jump after scare, public dialogue.


 

Resources:

Resources:

JoNel Aleccia. Measles vaccinations jump after scare, public dialogue. The Seattle Times. March 31, 2014. Retrieved 4.2.15.

Rachel La Corte. Lawmaker aims to limit reasons for vaccine exemptions. The Seattle Times. February 4, 2015. Retrieved 4.2.15

Washington State Department of Health. News Release: State vaccination rates for children lag behind national average. September 12, 2013. Retrieved 4.2.15.

Wolf, E., Opel, D., DeHart, M. et al. Impact of a Pertussis Epidemic on Infant Vaccination in Washington State. Pediatrics. pp 456-464, September 2014. Retrieved 4.2.15

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Categories: Infectious Disease + Vaccines, Policy, Politics, + Pop Health